Economic Benefits

Local and Statewide Jobs

Solar power is the fastest growing job sector in the United States.

The United States has 249,983 solar workers, defined as those who spend 50% or more of their time on solar-related work. The solar workforce added more than 5,600 jobs nationwide from 2018 to 2019.” – National Solar Job Census (2019)

“In fact, wind-turbine technicians and solar-panel installers are the fastest-growing jobs in the country, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The jobs are in such high demand, they are growing at a rate 12 times as fast as the rest of the US economy.” – Business Insider (August 2019)

US Solar Job Growth infographic
New Yorkers for Clean Power Green Jobs Map

Check out NYCP’s Green Jobs Map, and click here to jump to their webpage and visit the spreadsheet version of job opportunities! This map features jobs, trainings, internships and more in the clean energy, energy efficiency and clean transportation industries all across New York State. This is an ongoing project that you can contribute to if you know of a position that needs to be filled—add a point via this form.

How to Navigate the Green Jobs Map
  • Each point has a description with a point of contact and website.
  • To view the map key, click the top left corner of the map.
  • To view the jobs in a tabular format, see the first table on the data table below or click here.
  • To view remote jobs, see the second tab on the data table below or click here.
Correcting the Myth that Solar Harms Property Value

It is a common misconception that ground mounted solar farms decrease nearby property values.

  • Examining property value in states across the United States demonstrates that large-scale solar arrays often have no measurable impact on the value of adjacent properties, and in some cases may even have positive effects.
  • Proximity to solar farms does not deter the sales of agricultural or residential land.
  • Large solar projects have similar characteristics to a greenhouse or single-story residence. Usually no more than 10 feet high, solar farms are often enclosed by fencing and/or landscaping to minimize visual impacts.
The Numbers
  • A study conducted across Illinois determined that the value of properties within one mile increased by an average of 2 percent after the installation of a solar farm.1
  • An examination of 5 counties in Indiana indicated that upon completion of a solar farm, properties within 2 miles were an average of 2 percent more valuable compared to their value prior to installation.2
  • An appraisal study spanning from North Carolina to Tennessee shows that properties adjoining solar farms match the value of similar properties that do not adjoin solar farms within 1 percent.3
  • A study spanning counties with Existing Solar Farms in counties in Hawaii, California, New York, Minnesota and Indiana concluded an Average Variance in Sale Prices from Test to Control Areas to be +2.57 percent.4
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IBEW Third District Solar Map

This map displays the solar projects that will be operational in the next few years. Expand the map to filter by the year.

Harmony with Nearby Residential and Agricultural Property

1. Appearance: Large solar projects have similar characteristics to a greenhouse or single-story residence. Usually no more than 10 feet high, solar farms are often enclosed by fencing and/or landscaping to minimize visual impacts.

2. Noise: Solar projects are effectively silent. Tracking motors and inverters may produce an ambient hum that is not typically audible from outside the enclosure.

3. Odor: Solar projects do not produce any byproduct or odor.

4. Traffic: Solar projects do not attract high volumes of additional traffic as they do not require frequent maintenance after installation.

5. Hazardous Material: PV modules are constructed with the solar cells laminated into polymers and the minute amounts of heavy metals used in some panels cannot mix with water or vaporize into the air. Even in the case of module breakage, there is little to no risk of chemicals releasing into the environment.

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